Humor Page

humor

John’s Alleged Humor  (Added 2/4/2017) *

A PowerPoint: John’s Alleged Humor

More Assessment Humor (courtesy of John Willis) PowerPoint  (Sept 28, 2016) *

john-willis-cartoons

Rogerian Therapy Explained in One Brief Paragraph (circa 1948) *

It was about 1948 that an apocryphal story began circulating that parodied the idea of
passivity. Carl Rogers, it was said, was counseling a client in an office high up in an
office building.
The client: “I feel terrible.”
Rogers: “You feel terrible.”
The client: “I really feel terrible.”
Rogers: “You really feel terrible.”
The client: “For two cents I’d jump out of that window.”
Rogers: “For two cents you’d jump out of that window.”
Client,getting up and going to the window: “Here I go.”
He jumps out of the window.
Rogers,getting up and going to the window: “There you go.”
The client hits the ground.
Rogers: “Plop.”

 

A Very Quick Intelligence Test *

IQ 2

(See answers at bottom of page)

The Greatest Research Paper Ever Written *

Ron Dumont thought this research paper on bullshit one of the greatest research articles he has ever read.

On the Reception and Detection of Pseudo-Profound Bullshit (Gordon Pennycook, et. al. 2015)

ABSTRACT:  Although bullshit is common in everyday life and has attracted attention from philosophers, its reception (critical or ingenuous) has not, to our knowledge, been subject to empirical investigation. Here we focus on pseudo-profound bullshit, which consists of seemingly impressive assertions that are presented as true and meaningful but are actually vacuous. We presented participants with bullshit statements consisting of buzzwords randomly organized into statements with syntactic structure but no discernible meaning (e.g., “Wholeness quiets infinite phenomena”). Across multiple studies, the propensity to judge bullshit statements as profound was associated with a variety of conceptually relevant variables (e.g., intuitive cognitive style, supernatural belief). Parallel associations were less evident among profundity judgments for more conventionally profound (e.g., “A wet person does not fear the rain”) or mundane (e.g., “Newborn babies require constant attention”) statements. These results support the idea that some people are more receptive to this type of bullshit and that detecting it is not merely a matter of indiscriminate skepticism but rather a discernment of deceptive vagueness in otherwise impressive sounding claims. Our results also suggest that a bias toward accepting statements as true may be an important component of pseudo-profound bullshit receptivity

Dumont Willis Humor

http://www.myschoolpsychology.com/Humor.pdf

school psych1

Alternatively, another Classification System (NOT) to be Used in Reports * *

Scores Used in This Report

“When John and I re-standardize our DWEEEB IQ test, we plan to include this new classification system.”  Ron

There are, of course, 52 cards, so each card represents about 1.9% of the total sample. Ace through three (below average range) includes approximately the lowest quarter of scores. Four through six is approximately the middle half (average range) – roughly half of a full deck. Seven through nine (above average range) is approximately the highest quarter of scores. Only the highest four percent are actually playing with a full deck. Half of a deck is normal.

 

♠ ♥

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

♣ ♦

♠ ♥

Description

Need to Draw Three

Can Discard One

Almost a Quarter Deck

Almost Half a Deck

Half a Deck

More than Half a Deck

Almost a Full Deck

Nearly a Full Deck

Playing with a Full Deck

Range

Below Average Range

Average Range

Above Average Range

Number

Ace

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

Percent in Each

4%

7%

12%

17%

20%

17%

12%

7%

4%

DWEEEB *

 

A test for assessing no intellectual abilities for any children whatsoever.  Although intended to assess no ability in children aged 6 years through 16 years, 11 months, it has found extensive use by those wishing a quick and dirty assessment.   Although it is an old test, and the norms are therefore outdated, that really doesn’t matter because the test doesn’t measure anything really relevant anyway.

(To read the chapters below, see the drop down menus or click on the links)

Chapter 1  Introduction    DWEEEB: Chapter One

Chapter 2  Development and Standardization  DWEEEB: Chapter Two

Chapter 3  General Testing Considerations DWEEEB: Chapter Three

Chapter 4. Directions for Administration and Scoring  DWEEEB: Chapter Four

Chapter 5:  Statistical Properties of the Test  DWEEEB: Chapter Five

Chapter 6:  Validity  DWEEEB: Chapter Six

Chapter 7:  Norm’s Data  DWEEEB: Chapter Seven

Chapter 8:  References  DWEEEB: Chapter Eight

Special Conditions NOT to be reported on a Medicaid claim . . . *

Classification Terms Not To Be Used In Reports(found floating on the Web)
 

  1. A few Clowns Short Of a circus.
  2. A few fries short of a Happy Meal.
  3. An experiment in Artificial Stupidity.
  4. A few beers short of a 6-pack.
  5. Dumber than a box of hair.
  6. A few peas short of a casserole.
  7. Doesn’t have all his corn flakes in one box.
  8. The wheel’s spinning, but the hamster’s dead.
  9. One Fruit Loop shy of a full bowl.
  10. One taco short of a combination plate.
  11. A few feathers short of a whole duck.
  12. All foam, no beer.
  13. The cheese slid off his cracker.
  14. Body by Fisher, brains by Mattel.
  15. Has an IQ of 2, but it takes 3 to grunt.
  16. Warning- Objects in mirror are dumber than they appear.
  17. Couldn’t pour water out of a boot with instructions on the heel.
  18. Too much yardage between the goal posts.
  19. An intellect rivaled only by garden tools.
  20. As smart as bait.
  21. Chimney’s clogged.
  22. Doesn’t have all his dogs on one leash.
  23. Doesn’t know much but leads the league in nostril hair.
  24. Elevator doesn’t go all the way to the top floor.
  25. Forgot to pay his brain bill.
  26. Her sewing machine’s out of thread.
  27. Her antenna doesn’t pick up all the channels.
  28. His belt doesn’t go through all the loops.
  29. If he had another brain, it would be lonely.
  30. Missing a few buttons on her remote control,
  31. No grain in the silo.
  32. Proof that evolution can go in reverse.
  33. Receiver is off the hook.
  34. Several nuts short of a full pouch..

Testing the Dead – The Story of Sam McGee *

There are strange things done in the midnight sun
By the men who moil for gold;
The Arctic trails have their secret tales
That would make your blood run cold;
The Northern Lights have seen queer sights,
But the queerest they ever did see
Was that night on the marge of Lake Lebarge
I cremated Sam McGee.
 sam

JIFFY EVALUATION CENTER

DIAGNOSTIC EDUCATIONAL EVALUATION

Name: Sam McGee Test date: 2/16/99
Parents: Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Service Birth date 2/10/93
Address: 39 DawsonTrail Death date: 2/15/99
Moose Creek, Alaska Age: 6-0
School: Iditerod Elementary (6 years, 0 months)
Examiner: John O. Willis, Ed.D. Grade: 1.5

For full report on Sam, click on link above.

More Cartoons Collected by John Willis (July, 2016) *

A PowerPoint with 35 Cartoons

And Even More Cartoons (36) Collected by John Willis *

And another Collection of Cartoons (36) by John Willis

 

Answers to Intelligence Test

  1.  None.   Moses didn’t build an ark.
  2. Deaf people do not use raised print (braille)
  3.  Yes.
  4.  Go.
  5. Noon.
  6. Water.