Stanford Binet Fifth Edition

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Stanford-Binet Fifth Edition (SB5) *

Broad and Narrow Abilities

Dumont-Willis

These classifications are based on Ron Dumont and John Willis’s understanding of the Gf-Gc classification system.  These may or may not be consistent with the SB5 manuals.

Nonverbal

Verbal

Broad Gf-Gc

Activity

Narrow Ability

Testlet

Activity

Narrow Ability

Testlet

Fluid Reasoning

Object Series Induction Routing Early Reasoning Induction 2, 3
Matrices Induction Routing Verbal Absurdities Induction, Language Development 4
Verbal Analogies Induction, Language Development 5, 6

Crystallized

Procedural Knowledge Language Development, Listening Ability 2, 3 Vocabulary Language Development Routing
Picture Absurdities Language Development, General Information 4, 5, 6

Quantitative Reasoning

Quantitative Reasoning Mathematical Achievement 2, 3, 4 Quantitative Reasoning Mathematical Knowledge 2, 3
Mathematical Achievement, Working Memory 5 Mathematical Achievement 4
Mathematical Achievement 6 Mathematical Achievement, Working Memory 5, 6

Visual Spatial Processing

Form Board Visualization 1, 2 Position and Direction Spatial Relations 2, 3, 4
Form Pattern Visualization 3, 4, 5, 6 Visualization 5, 6

Short-term Memory

Delayed Response Working Memory 1 Memory for Sentences Memory Span, Language Development 2, 3
Block Span Memory Span 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Last Word Working Memory 4, 5, 6

Induction: Ability to discover the underlying characteristic that governs a problem or set of materials; Language Development: General development or the understanding of words, sentences, and paragraphs (not requiring reading) in spoken native language skills; Listening Ability: Ability to listen and comprehend oral communications; General Information: Range of general knowledge; Mathematical Achievement: Measured mathematics achievement; Mathematical Knowledge: Range of general knowledge about mathematics; Visualization: Ability to manipulate objects or visual patterns mentally and to “see” how they would appear under altered conditions; Spatial Relations: Ability to perceive and manipulate visual patterns rapidly or to maintain orientation with respect to objects in space; Working Memory: Ability to store temporarily and perform a set of cognitive operations on information that requires divided attention and the management of the limited capacity of short-term memory; Memory Span: Ability to attend to and immediately recall temporally ordered elements in the correct order after a single presentation

D. P. Flanagan, S. O. Ortiz, V. Alphonso, & J. T. Mascolo (2002) Achievement Test Desk Reference (ATDR): Comprehensive Assessment and Learning Disability (Boston: Allyn & Bacon)

K. S. McGrew, & D. P. Flanagan (1998), The Intelligence Test Desk Reference (ITDR): Gf-Gc Cross-Battery Assessment (Boston: Allyn & Bacon)

Stanford-Binet Fifth Edition (SB5)

Random comments and clarifications

Dumont Willis

·         Only the routing tests (Object Series/Matrices and Vocabulary) utilize a discontinuation rule.  For all other “testlets”, test entire testlet and follow basal and ceiling rules for each level.

·         On non routing testlets, if a person reaches a basal, drop back immediately to the previous level and administer the appropriate testlet.

·         Remember to give full credit to testlets not administered.

·         Notice that when transferring testlets raw scores from the inside of the record form to the front page of the record form, the testlets inside are arranged in the following order

1     2

    3     4

                   while the scores are arranged as                           1  2  3  4        on the front of the record form

                                                                     .

·         For subtests that have allotted “time limits,” indicated by a stopwatch, examiners use specific prompts to alert the examinee that they must move on.  For example, on the Level 4 Nonverbal Visual-Spatial Processing Form Board activity, after 120 or 180 seconds (depending upon the item), the examiner says, “Shall we try another?” After 30 seconds more, the examiner says, “Let’s move on to the next one.”

·         On selected items that do not have specific time limits, indicated by an hourglass, examiners are encouraged to utilize the “examiner prompt rule” (see page 39.)  According to this rule, if the behavior of the examinee clearly indicates that he or she is “(1) hopelessly stymied, (2) guessing at items that are far too difficult, (3) totally distracted from the task, or (4) extremely frustrated” the examiner should use the prompts to help keep the testing session well-paced.

 

Nonverbal Fluid Reasoning (Object Series/Matrices –Routing)

·         The Object Series/Matrices subtest is easy to administer. Leave the booklet on the table and turn over the pages one at a time to show consecutive pictures.

·         Allow the child to turn the pages in the test booklet if the child wants to and you are sure that you can set the pace.

·         Have the child point to the answer to indicate a correct response. Examinees are not required to verbalize the letter code for an answer, but if they choose to do so, you may accept a verbal answer.

·         Items 19-36 have a time limit of 3 minutes per item – this is contradictory to the information given on page 39

 

Verbal Fluid Reasoning

·         The Verbal Fluid Reasoning subtest is easy to administer. Leave the booklet on the table and turn over the pages one at a time to show consecutive pictures.

·         Allow the child to turn the pages in the test booklet if the child wants to and you are sure that you can set the pace.

·         If the person gives an ambiguous or incomplete response query the person by saying “Tell me more.”

·         Some people may not provide complete answers or simply point to objects in the pictures. You may prompt the examinee once per item by saying “Tell me more about it” or by pointing at an item and saying “What is this.”

·         Responses listed in the test booklet with a “Q,” should be queried with “Tell me more.”

·         Only the examinee’s ideas and content affect the scoring.  Do not penalize for articulations, grammar, or language rules.

·         There is a 5 minute time limit for the Level 3 Early Reasoning sorting activity.

·         On the sorting activity, not all possible sorts are listed in the test booklet.  Any sort that is unconventional yet accurate is scored as correct.

·         On the sorting activity, there are five specific prompts that may be used as often as needed.

·         On the sorting activity, remember to remove each set of 3 sorted chips after the person selects and names them.

·         For the Level 4 Verbal Absurdities activity, corrective feedback, using the prompt provided in the test booklet, is only given for item 1.

·         For the Level 4 Verbal Absurdities activity, Appendix D.5 (Examiners manual, p. 300) provides guidelines to aid in scoring responses.

·         For the Level 5 and 6 Verbal Analogies activity, Appendix D.7 (Examiners manual, pp. 304-310) provides guidelines to aid in scoring responses.

 

Nonverbal Knowledge

·         Level 2, Items 2-6 are untimed but the administration directions say “Allow the examinee 20 seconds to respond.”

·         To obtain credit at level 1, the examinee must physically demonstrate the procedure

·         Level 3 items 1-6 all require a nonverbal response.  If a person verbally responds without a nonverbal demonstration, say “Show me” to prompt for a demonstration.

·         Level 4, 5, and 6, items 1-6 typically require a verbal and a pointing response

·         Level 4, 5, and 6, could be responded to with totally nonverbal responses involving pointing and pantomime. If a person verbally responds without a nonverbal demonstration, say “Show me” to prompt for a demonstration.

 

Verbal Knowledge (Vocabulary)

·         The subtest is not timed.

·         Pronounce each word clearly and correctly. A pronunciation guide is provided in Appendix D.2 (p. 285).

·         Record the examinee’s exact response in the space provided on the record form.

·         Point to the picture as you say the word on items 1.

·         Tell the child the correct answer when he or she fails items 1, 2, 4, 6, 10 and 15. Do not give the child the correct answer to any other items.

·         For items 15 through 44, the scoring guidelines following each item in the test booklet list many responses that you should query, shown by a “(Q).” Study these guidelines, and the expanded definitions in Appendix D.2, carefully so that you can recognize responses that you need to query. You need to query not only all responses followed by a (Q) in the manual, but also any other responses that are not in the manual if you think that a query is needed.

·         Unclear or vague responses can be followed up by saying, “Tell me more.” The nature of the child’s response should determine whether you query it during the standard administration. [With peculiar responses it is often advisable to ask “And what word did I ask you” to see if the child heard the correct word to define.]

·         On items 10 to 14 (the picture items) the test booklet pages gives correct one-word responses.  Items 10, 11, 13, and 14 give only one correct possible response.  Item 12 lists 3 possible correct responses. There are probably other, acceptable responses that a person might give.  Examiner judgment must be used in these cases.

·         Two of the words (items 34 and 37) have two acceptable pronunciations. You may provide both to the examinee.

 

Nonverbal Quantitative Reasoning

·         The Nonverbal Quantitative Reasoning subtest requires the use of several manipulatives (e.g., counting rods, blocks, cup, layout card).  Have these organized and ready for use.

·         Place counting rods parallel to each other and orient them vertically.

·         Award credit for Level 2, item 5, even if the cup used tips over after the examinee places the block in the cup.

·         The first item in each of the Level 2, 3, 4, and 5 testlets include corrective feedback to the examinee. Level 6 does not provide any corrective feedback.

·         Level 3, items 3 and 4, utilize the layout card as a screen.  Place the less colorful side of the card toward the examinee.

·         Because this is intended to be a nonverbal subtest, if the examinee answers items orally, remind them by saying “Be sure to show me” (Level 3, items 3 and 4) or “Show me” (Levels 4, 5, and 6, all items).

·         For items in Level 6, if the examinee gives an oral response that is not one of the options provided, say “Which of these is the correct answer” while waving your hand across the Item Book page.

·         Award credit for a correct answer even if the examinee does respond orally.

·         There is no time limit for the Level 2 or 3. However, use the “Examiners Prompt” for Levels 4, 5, and 6 unless you know the examinee has high ability.

·         On Level 4, item 1, it is acceptable for the examinee to pick up and examine the counting rods.

·         Paper and pencil may be only be used at Level 6.

 

Verbal Quantitative Reasoning

·         The Verbal Quantitative Reasoning subtest requires the use of several manipulatives (e.g., toys, counting rods).  Have these organized and ready for use.

·         The first item in the Level 2, 3, 4, and 5 testlet include corrective feedback to the examinee. Level 6 does not provide any corrective feedback.

·         Level 2, Item 1 requires the child to count correctly to 3 or beyond.  Provide the corrective feedback presented in the test booklet if the child does not count correctly.

·         Level 2, Item 1 requires the child to count correctly to 3 or beyond.  It is unclear if the examiner can ask for more numbers if the child responds “One, two.”

·         For Level 2, items 2 to 6, the examinee must respond orally in order to receive credit.  Nonverbal responses (tapping without counting, holding up fingers without saying the correct response) are scored as 0.

·         Be careful not to change the wording for Level 3, item 4. Only the words in the printed directions are acceptable.

·         For Level 4, items 2 and 3, the examinee may take apart the block structure to count the segments

·         Only the last two levels (5 and 6) allow the examinee to use paper and pencil

·         There is no time limit for the Level 2, 3 or 4. However, use the “Examiners Prompt” for Levels 5 and 6 unless you know the examinee has high ability.

·         Proofs for the Level 5 and 6 problems are provided in Appendix D.6 of the Examiner’s manual (pp. 301-303).

 

Nonverbal Visual-Spatial Processing

·         The area on your desk that you use to administer Nonverbal Visual-Spatial Processing should be clear.

·         When first presenting the Form Board activity to the examinee, have the pieces in the form board.

·         Be very careful about the placement of the pieces on the table in front of the form board.

·         Level 1, item 4 and Level 2, item 6 require the examiner to turn the form board 180° and 90° respectively.  Do not allow the examinee to move the form board.

·         Give the child only the appropriate number of pieces needed for each item. You need to consult the Materials Needed section (upper left hand corner) of the Item Book to determine the number of pieces needed for each item.

·         Scramble the blocks into a “random order” before you administer each new item, and place before the child the exact number of blocks needed for each item.

·         Use 4 form board pieces for Level 3, sample and item 1.

·         Use 9 form board pieces for Level 3, items 2 and 3, and Level 4, sample and all items.

·         Use 10 form board pieces for both Level 5 and 6, all items.

·         On page 69 of the Examiner’s manual, it notes “Examinees do not need to place the half pieces (semicircles and rectangles) in a particular horizontal or vertical orientation to receive credit for an item.”  Note that this pertains only to Level 2 Form Board activity.  On the items of the Form pattern activity, the semicircle and rectangle pieces must, at times, be places with correct vertical or horizontal orientation.

·         On page 73 of the Examiner’s manual, it notes “Pictures of correct (scored 2), partly correct (score 1), and incorrect (scored 0) designs are provided in Item Book 2.”  The Item Book 2 pages actually only contain pictures of 2- and 1-point responses.

·         On page 73 of the Examiner’s manual, regarding time limits, it notes “For example, on Item 1, if the examinee has not responded after 60 seconds, say ‘Shall we try another one?’”  This prompt is actually given after 60 seconds if the examinee has not completed the design. The prompt must be given at the 60- second limit even if the examinee has responded to the item direction to “Make one just like this on the table.”

·         On page 80 of the Examiner’s manual, items for the Level 4 testlet, it notes “For easy administration, leave the pieces from Item 1 on the table and add the pieces needed for Items 2 and 3.”  Items 2 and 3 do not require any additional items beyond the 9 pieces already provided for Item 1.

·         Practice assembling the sample items before administering the test for the first time.

·         Study carefully the scoring samples provided in the Item Book and the Record Form. Additional instructions are also provided in the Examiner’s Manual, pages 74-75

·         All non-sample items for Levels 3, 4, 5, and 6 have specified time limits.

·         Be careful not to show the Record Form to the examinee because it contains a picture of the correct pattern assembly.

·         Completely rotated designs that maintain the gestalt and alignment of items and meet the 2-point criteria are allowed.

·         For Level 5, the sample item is the same as that used in Level 4. If the examinee was routed to level 5, begin testing with the sample item.  For examinees who were already administered the design at Level 4, say “Remember these?” and go on to item 1.

·         Alternative solutions are possible for Level 5, Items 2 and 3 and Level 6, item 2.

·         Gestalt is defined as a configuration of pieces that form a recognizable whole.

·         Freestanding is defined as any piece not touching another piece or any piece touching at only one point or at a rounded edge.

·         Disheveled is defined as a piece that is more than slightly rotated or shifted, but not more than 45°.

·         Incorrectly placed is defined as any piece that is in the wrong location relative to the other pieces.

·         Very slight rotation is defined as any piece that is rotated less than 10°

·         Slight rotation is defined as any piece that is rotated 11° to 45°.

·         Expect many 1-point responses in Levels 4 through 6

 

Verbal Visual-Spatial Processing

·         The area on your desk that you use to administer Verbal Visual-Spatial Processing should be clear.

·         Note that Verbal Visual-Spatial Processing Levels 2, 3, and 4 do not require a verbal response.

·         Have the ball, cup, and a green block available for this subtest.

·         Lay the Item Book flat on the table for levels 2, 3, and 4. For level 5, do not lay the Item Book flat on the table since the correct answers are circled on the examiner’s page.

·         Only Item 1 in Levels 2 through 5 provide corrective feedback.  No other demonstration or feedback may be given

·         For Level 2, Item 2 (ball on top of cup), the ball does not have to remain on the cup for a correct response.

·         For Level 2, Item 4, correct placement of the block means any place at the bottom half of the house.

·         For Level 2, Items 3 though 6, correct placement of the block means that at least half of the block surface is placed on the correct item.

·         For Level 3, Item 1, correct placement of the block means that it is to the examiner’s left of the girl’s leg.

·         For Level 3, Item 1, if the examinee places the block on the table in front of the flat Item Book, query or use your judgment to determine if the block placement is a guess or a truly correct response with good rationale.

·         For Level 3, Item 2, correct placement of the block means that it is to the examiner’s right of the girl’s leg.

·         For Level 3, Item 6, if the examinee places the block on the intersection of the two roads, query to determine if the block placement is a guess or a truly correct response with good rationale.

·         Level 5, items 4, 5, and 6 and Level 6, all items may be repeated one time.

·         For Level 5, items 1, 2, and 3, to obtain a correct answer the directions given must stay on the “path.”  No short cuts across grass are accepted.

·         For Level 5, items 1, 2, and 3, if the answer includes a short cut that cuts across grass, say “No, stick to the path.” Score as …

 

Nonverbal Working Memory

·         The area on your desk that you use to administer Nonverbal Working Memory should be clear.

·         When using the layout card as a screen (Level 1), place the less colorful side of the card toward the examinee.

·         Be very careful about the placement of the pieces under the cup.  The directions in the test item book are oriented from the examiner’s perspective.

·         When using the layout card for block placement (Levels 2 through 6), orient the card so that the numbers face you and the yellow row is farthest away from you.

·         Do not repeat sample items unless the examinee requires special accommodations.

·         Do not repeat any tapping items.

·         Do not give partial credit for correctly tapping some, but not all, of the sequence.

·         Tap only with the block.  Do not use your finger in place of the tapping block..

·         Tap the blocks at a rate of one tap per second.

·         Do not slide the tapping block horizontally from one block to another.  Use a clear, exaggerated, up and down motion to draw the examinee’s attention to the task.

·         Do not pause when tapping blocks in separate rows.  This action could be a cue to the examinee.

·         Place only the required number of blocks on the layout card or in front of the examinee.

·         For the Levels 3, sample 2 item, be sure to speak slowly and clearly.  Emphasize the words yellow and red and point to each row in turn.  Use an exaggerated gesture to focus the examinee’s attention.

·         For items at Levels 3 through 6, pause 2 to 5 seconds before tapping the block sequence.  Use this delay to mentally rehearse the sequence and to insure a smooth administration.

·         For items in level 4 through 6, if the examinee correctly sorts the taps in the yellow and red rows, you do not need to repeat the prompt for every item (“Now tap the same blocks I tapped, but tap the blocks in the yellow row in order first and then tap the blocks in the red row in order.”)

 

Verbal Working Memory

·         Place the easel in the upright position

·         Read each sentence or phrase clearly and at an even rate.  Drop your voice at the end of each sentence.

·         Do not repeat any of the items.

·         When using the layout card for block placement (Levels 2 through 6), orient the card so that the numbers face you and the yellow row is farthest away from you.

·         For the Memory for Sentences items, scoring errors include word changes, word omissions, or adding words.  Additionally, changes in tenses, person, or singular/plural are counted as errors.

·         For the Memory for Sentences items, scoring errors do not the use of contractions or poor articulation of the words.

·         For the Last Word activity, the person must answer a series of “yes” or “no” questions, or questions involving logic (e.g., If two people weigh the same, who is older?”).  Accept any answer, including nonverbal head nods (but not a vague response such as “Uh”), regardless of whether or not it is correct. If a person does not respond in some acceptable fashion, ask for an answer before continuing to the next item.

·         Do not record the “yes” or “no” responses.

·         Give corrective feedback only to the sample items and only using the prompts provided.

·         It is acceptable for the examinee to vocally rehearse during the item presentation.

·         Do not pause between items. Pause only for the examinee to answer the question and then read the next question.